Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)


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Twentieth-Century Russian Poetry

One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do. They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. Arguments are conversations.

Edited By Leslie Boldt, Corrado Federici and Ernesto Virgulti

There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion. They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and of course writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media. This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form.

You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them. These specialized sections of WR will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors. Course Description: Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do.

They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing.

Course Description: WR is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craftsections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term.

Successful completion of Writing is a prerequisite for this course. Course Description: Consider the following: The tume snoggled a gumulent dern. But how do you know it? How does it work? How do you translate it into your writing and avoid common pitfalls? Where, for example, do the commas really go? When should you use whom, and to whom does it matter? And is it really so wrong to start a sentence with and? This course will answer these questions and many others, introducing you to the structures of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar, so that your own writing choices can be more conscientious and effective—whether you stick to the rules or not.

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay.

More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction. Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion. Course Description: This course is designed to help you sharpen your sensitivity to language and become a skilled reader and writer of poetry. We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideasinto. In the workshop, we will discuss your own poems in depth. We will also read and study a variety of published poems to understand both the nature of contemporary poetry and the literary tradition of which we, as poets, are a part.

Course Description: In Writing for the Web, students analyze the complex interactions between audiences, texts, and digital writing technologies. Students examine the shifts in purpose, genre, and rhetorical approach across digital platforms, learning to adapt their own message to suit a given medium. Throughout the term, we will interact with various networked communities and hone skills in creating rhetorically-savvy web documents on social media, Wikipedia and beyond. Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways.

Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity. This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of original fiction, one of which will be workshopped in class. Many would argue that writing cannot be taught. Course Description: WR is the prerequisite to this course no exceptions.

John Schad

This section of WR is a Hybrid course: class will meet once a week in person, with the remaining components occurring online. Course Description: Technical Writing WR will prepare you to produce instructive, informative, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise,concise, logically organized, and factually based. The purpose and target audience of each document determine the style that an author chooses, which includes document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals.

Hence, this course will teach processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents efficiently. This approach serves two purposes.

In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field. Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the dynamic and fast-growing genre of creative nonfiction.

You will be expected to read up to pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week. Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course. Special Topics: Anthropocene Now! Course Description: This creative writing course focuses on three main topics: story structure, story outlining and the development of a properly formatted screenplay. Students will then apply this understanding toward pitching, outlining, composing, workshopping, and revising the pilot episode of a series of their own creation. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory.

Course Description: This one-credit course provides an opportunity for students enrolled in the certificate in scientific, technical, and professional communication to compose and design a portfolio of their existing work for future professional use. The course covers the purpose and goals in creating a portfolio, the selection and organization of materials, the formation of an editing and revision plan, the development of contextual summaries, the writing of an introductory letter, and the delivery of a finished portfolio project.

Faculty will assist students in these decisions throughout the five-week course, each week focusing on smaller elements of the portfolio project. The portfolio will be proof of the work students have completed in their certificate program and assist students in representing those abilities to others.

Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the genre of magazine writing. Classmembers will read selections from The Best American Magazine Writing, and will use them as examples of craft while writing their own article. We will also discuss student works-in-progress in a workshop setting, and the process of pitching an article for publication. Students will be expected to read up to pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write weekly exercises and assignments.

Course Description: This course offers students an inside track to writing and publishing book reviews about new fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, journalism, literary studies, history, poetry, and more. What is the role of the book reviewer? What are the latest issues, opportunities, and pitfalls facing the contemporary book critic?

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Above all, our primary focus will be writing dynamic, readable, thoughtful book reviews. Practical applications include: querying editors of publications, developing strategies forwriting and placing reviews, and handing the writing of shorter vs. Course Description: By exploring the interrelated concepts of race, racialization, and racism, Rhetorics of Race problematizes race as a taken-for-granted phenomenon. As rhetoricians, we pay close attention to how rhetoric and discourse have the power to reproduce and challenge white supremacy and race-based oppressions. Course Description: Digital Literacy and Culture examines the relationships between human expression and the technologies we use to mediate those expressions.

This class will explore the various literacy practices that shape our experiences of writing, thinking, and meaning-making in this age of information. We will trace the historical and cultural lineages of digital technologies, thinking through the ways that social networks, smartphones, and, artificial intelligence, and digitized mass media have reshaped the means and ends of cultural production. Skip to main content. Google Tag Manager. Toggle menu Go to search page. Search Field. Fall Course Descriptions.

Find them here. Download the PDF version of this term's course descriptions soon! Apply this course to the Applied Journalism minor! Jacques Day: MWF Time: Course Description: Journalists in AJ craft narratives for publication across an array of media, with an eye to producing meticulously crafted multimedia stories for publication in digital venues. Day: TR Time: Course Description: This class will focus on modern Middle Eastern literature from multiple perspectives: cultural, political, religious, historical, geographical, linguistic, structural, stylistic, thematic, comparative, and other points of view.

Day: Ecampus Course Description: Focusing on some of the prominent thematic, stylistic, historical, and cultural aspects of American modernism, this class will combine famous classics with important novels other than the ones commonly perceived as canonical. We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideasinto finished poems.

The Religious in Responses to Mass Atrocity: Interdisciplinary Perspectives

Course Descriptions: Applied Journalism. The working thesis of the course is that the various challenges presented by modern physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, and communication theory are not only reflected in but also transformed by modern cultural artifacts and literary theories. Students will explore the significance of such interdisciplinary translations through a variety of generic perspectives including drama, essay, fiction, and autobiography. In this class, we will study the history of the English language over the last years, examining its syntax, grammar, and vocabulary in its social, political, and artistic context.

How do war, trade, globalization, memes, and tourism affect language? Course Description: This class will attend post-rating system Hollywood present by closely examining the important films and filmmakers of the period along with key events in the business of developing, producing, distributing, and exhibiting motion pictures. There are no prerequisites for this course. This is an ambitious academic course, not a film appreciation class. This course will be delivered via Canvas where you will interact with your classmates and with your instructor. Within the course Canvas site you will access the learning materials, such as the syllabus, class discussions, assignments, projects, and quizzes.

To preview how an online course works, visit the Ecampus Course Demo. The class surveys science fiction films from turn of the 20th century futurist shorts like Trip to the Moon and silent era classics like Metropolis through contemporary dystopian fantasies like Gattaca and Ex-Machina. See the Course Catalog for available sections.

Course Description: WR is designed to help students develop skills and confidence in analytical writing. It also emphasizes rhetorical awareness—the perception of where, how, and why persuasion is occurring. Assignments and in-class activities will emphasize and explore the process of writing, including acts of reading, researching, analytical thinking, freewriting, drafting, review, revision, and editing.

Course Description: This course offers you an adaptive series of lessons designed to increase your proficiency in grammar, syntax, and sentence-level writing. A diagnostic survey at the beginning will identify your priorities and tailor content to suit your unique needs and goals. Course Description: WR Writing for Media introduces students to reporting news across traditional and new media forms.

Students compose stories in newspaper, radio, broadcast, blog, digital reporting and multimedia styles. The course requires students to conduct interviews, compile research, and turn in publishable articles by deadline. The final assignment in this course the multimedia package , is a team assignment and will require scheduling time outside of class for its completion.

Course Description: Thoughtful and thorough communication across multiple audiences and for multiple purposes continues to be an extremely important skill set in business. One look at the title of your textbook supports that claim. Arguments live in everything we see, think and do.

They can be as overt as a Presidential debate and as subtle as a paint color. When you start seeing argumentation in this way, the possibilities are endless. Arguments are conversations. There is more than one voice in the room. They are grounded in the art of persuasion.

calls for papers | IRSCL News | Page 2

They succeed and fail on an understanding of audience. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, brain storming, peer reviewing, revising, debating and of course writing. You will develop strategies to help you interpret a variety of texts and compose in a variety of media.

prisma.prod.leadereq.ai/979.php This course will show you how a sound argument moves, considering structure, support and form. You will improve your ability to revise your ideas, the reasoning that supports those ideas, and the writing that illustrates them. These specialized sections of WR will continue practice in expository writing with an emphasis on argumentation and research specifically for Psychology Majors.

Course Description: Arguments live in everything we see, think, and do. They can be as overt as an intense debate and as subtle as a paint color. As varied as arguments come, there are tried and true constants in the analysis and crafting of their myriad messages. In this course, you will learn the basics of what goes into good argumentative writing through extensive reading, analyzing, and writing. Course Description: WR is an introduction to the writing of fiction. Assessment methods include creative writing exercises, quizzes and reading checks on textbook craftsections, peer review, and the evolution of a short story from first to final, polished draft by the end of the term.

Successful completion of Writing is a prerequisite for this course. Course Description: Consider the following: The tume snoggled a gumulent dern. But how do you know it? How does it work? How do you translate it into your writing and avoid common pitfalls?

Where, for example, do the commas really go?


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When should you use whom, and to whom does it matter? And is it really so wrong to start a sentence with and? This course will answer these questions and many others, introducing you to the structures of sentences with a focus on beginning grammar, so that your own writing choices can be more conscientious and effective—whether you stick to the rules or not.

Course Description: Creative nonfiction is the genre of creative writing that bridges the act of making literary prose--the crafting of vivid scenes, a thoughtful narrative voice, and meaningful formats--with the kinds of practical personal writing often required in our academic and professional lives. In this course, we will discuss several published pieces from the creative nonfiction genre, including personal essays, memoir, and lyric essay. More importantly, we will also write, edit, workshop, and revise several pieces of our own creative nonfiction.

Expect a lively class with lots of imaginative prompts, free-writes, and hardy discussion. Course Description: This course is designed to help you sharpen your sensitivity to language and become a skilled reader and writer of poetry. We will work on in-class writing exercises to help coax your initial ideasinto. In the workshop, we will discuss your own poems in depth. We will also read and study a variety of published poems to understand both the nature of contemporary poetry and the literary tradition of which we, as poets, are a part.

Course Description: In Writing for the Web, students analyze the complex interactions between audiences, texts, and digital writing technologies. Students examine the shifts in purpose, genre, and rhetorical approach across digital platforms, learning to adapt their own message to suit a given medium. Throughout the term, we will interact with various networked communities and hone skills in creating rhetorically-savvy web documents on social media, Wikipedia and beyond. Course Description: Writing and the reading of writing are social processes that encourage the reader to interpret and respond to texts in varied, unique, and often complex ways.

Students will be challenged to conceive of and develop their own style, focusing on elements of diction, tone, emphasis, shape and clarity. This course will follow the workshop model of peer critique, so be prepared to write and read quite a bit and have at least two pieces of original fiction, one of which will be workshopped in class. Many would argue that writing cannot be taught. Course Description: WR is the prerequisite to this course no exceptions. This section of WR is a Hybrid course: class will meet once a week in person, with the remaining components occurring online.

Course Description: Technical Writing WR will prepare you to produce instructive, informative, and persuasive documents aimed at well-defined and achievable outcomes. Technical documents are precise,concise, logically organized, and factually based. The purpose and target audience of each document determine the style that an author chooses, which includes document layout, vocabulary, sentence and paragraph structure, and visuals. Hence, this course will teach processes for analyzing writing contexts and producing effective, clean, and reader-centered documents efficiently.

This approach serves two purposes.

Symbolism, Motif & Theme

In other words, participation in this course not only will help you become a better engineering communicator but will also lead to greater conceptual and technical fluency in your chosen field. Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the dynamic and fast-growing genre of creative nonfiction. You will be expected to read up to pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write assignments or exercises every week.

Daniel Palmer

Please consider this workload before enrolling in the course. Special Topics: Anthropocene Now! Course Description: This creative writing course focuses on three main topics: story structure, story outlining and the development of a properly formatted screenplay. Students will then apply this understanding toward pitching, outlining, composing, workshopping, and revising the pilot episode of a series of their own creation. This course is designed to introduce current and future teachers of writing to theory and pedagogy in composition studies, to help us become aware of and strengthen our own writing processes, and to enable us to make and express connections between classroom experience and composition theory.

Course Description: This one-credit course provides an opportunity for students enrolled in the certificate in scientific, technical, and professional communication to compose and design a portfolio of their existing work for future professional use. The course covers the purpose and goals in creating a portfolio, the selection and organization of materials, the formation of an editing and revision plan, the development of contextual summaries, the writing of an introductory letter, and the delivery of a finished portfolio project.

Faculty will assist students in these decisions throughout the five-week course, each week focusing on smaller elements of the portfolio project. The portfolio will be proof of the work students have completed in their certificate program and assist students in representing those abilities to others. Course Description: This course will focus on reading, writing, and understanding the genre of magazine writing.

Classmembers will read selections from The Best American Magazine Writing, and will use them as examples of craft while writing their own article. We will also discuss student works-in-progress in a workshop setting, and the process of pitching an article for publication. Students will be expected to read up to pages per week, to participate each day in discussion, and to write weekly exercises and assignments. Course Description: This course offers students an inside track to writing and publishing book reviews about new fiction, memoir, creative nonfiction, journalism, literary studies, history, poetry, and more.

Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature) Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)
Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature) Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)
Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature) Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)
Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature) Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)
Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature) Silence and the Silenced: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Studies on Themes and Motifs in Literature)

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