Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)


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The story is, of course, solid as well. As are pretty much all Redwall books, it's one part quest and one part large-scale conflict. There's a journey undertaken by small numbers of characters - actually, there are two such journeys in parallel. There are obstacles to overcome, minor foes to defeat, and puzzles to solve. An army is raised and, in the end, meets another such in pitched battle. Anyone familiar with the series already knows what to expect in terms of plot.

What brings this book to life - as with any Redwall book - is the cast of characters. It is, as usual, fairly extensive, and I'm not interested in discussing all of them at the moment. Rest assured that they're as entertaining as ever, and that this book has a healthy population of the always-entertaining hares. I do want to talk about one character in particular: Dorothea Duckfontein Dillworthy, known as Dotti. She's a young haremaid, the first companion of the titular Lord Brocktree, and interestingly placed in the narrative.

Despite being young, female, and largely unarmed, she is treated as just as much a warrior as any other character; her first scene is a battle with would-be robbers. She is simultaneously presented with the flaws of youth - overexcitedness, rash decision making, etc - and with a lot of things that, especially in the Redwall universe, are cardinal virtues. She's friendly and loyal, she's courageous, she's dedicated, she's empathetic, she stands strong under pressure. What stands out to me about this is that, for all he was writing for young readers, Jacques wrote fairly conventional heroic fantasy stories in structure and conflict.

It is therefore notable that one of the main characters, and the one written most so that the reader identifies with her, is young and female - not exactly a common choice for a genre which is traditionally extremely masculine. Reflecting on Dotti got me thinking about one of the things I like best about Redwall in general: that in the years I've been reading the series, I've never felt like there was no place for me in the world it portrayed.

There are male healers Brome of Noonvale and female war leaders Cregga Roseyes , among many others. I'm not claiming that Mossflower is all-encompassing in its inclusivity. But for a young girl who was just starting to get into reading as a hobby, and fantasy as a genre, it was immensely important to find a world that didn't adhere to tired old gender roles. Redwall has always felt like a safe space to me, and I think that's a large part of it: there is no judgement built into it, no strictures other than not hurting others. As characters so often say in the last chapter of the books, the doors of the Abbey are always open to friends.

On a different note - a specific point of the morality of the series where I feel Lord Brocktree is particularly strong. The rule of the mountain of Salamandastron is essentially one of divine right; there is always a Badger Lord or Lady in charge, always hares serving them faithfully. Often, rule passes down family lineages - Stonepaw to Brocktree; Brocktree presumably to his son when the time comes.

And yet, their rule is not justified by birth or species, but by actions: as leaders, they must be wise, fair, kind, and brave, and those are the traits that make them fit to rule. Brocktree demonstrates this over and over: most notably in sending Dotti to confront King Bucko instead of doing so himself simultaneously ensuring both that she grows stronger and more self-confident and that he doesn't win the contest by unfair species advantage , and in fighting Ungatt Trunn in single combat as honorably as possible, rather than claiming victory by trickery.

He earns the right to be Lord of Salamandastron by the virtues of his actions. To end this rather disorganized review, here are a few of my favorite quotes: A venturesom ferret, who had aspirations to captaincy, charged forward, urging the rest on. They're good fun, and their essential optimism about people of all kinds is invaluable in these all too pessimistic times.

View 2 comments. Dec 10, Jane Jago rated it it was amazing. Sad to have finished this one. I do love a Redwall tale. There is something infinitely comfortable about them and yet they still entertain. View 1 comment. Give justice to all, be fearless in battle and always ready to defend the right. This is the best entry in the series since The Bellmaker , episode seven in the Redwall sag "Defend the weak, protect both young and old, never desert your friends. This is the best entry in the series since The Bellmaker , episode seven in the Redwall saga.

Reaching back through the rich history alluded to in previous Redwall novels, Brian Jacques casts a spell of gorgeous language and strong, brave characters as he tells the legend of Lord Brocktree, the Badger Lord who organized Salamandastron into the powerful fortress it became in later years. Leader of the stouthearted Long Patrol of warrior hares, Badger Lords down through the ages fought with everything they had to protect all innocent creatures, often sacrificing their own life to rid the world of vermin.

Leaving his mountain home of Salamandastron at a young age, Brocktree wanders Mossflower country in search of his destiny. His father, Lord Stonepaw, is the acting Badger Lord, and it is always difficult for two male badgers to inhabit the same dwelling without a great deal of resulting friction due to their headstrong personalities. On his way Brocktree makes the acquaintance of a young hare named Dorothea, who had struck out on her own after her parents decided that it would be best for her to make a life for herself away from home.

Together, Brocktree and Dorothea find their way in the world, trying to figure out what fate may have in store for each of them, while learning about themselves and what it takes to maintain a friendship. Back on Salamandastron, the aging Lord Stonepaw and his courageous hares, who are also quite old and well past their peak physical years, are met with an ominous challenge from a dark, evil marauder, a wildcat by the name of Ungatt Trunn.

Supporting Trunn is a vast sea of assorted vermin, too numerous to count and impossible to defend the mountain against for very long. The siege follows predictable lines and Lord Stonepaw manages to escape to the interior of the mountain with a couple dozen of his most resourceful hares, to hopefully await rescue from someone who may have what it takes to challenge Trunn's stranglehold on Salamandastron. Eventually, Brocktree and Dorothea receive word about the goings-on at the mountain, and Brocktree realizes at last where his destiny is leading him.

He is being called to lead the charge on Trunn's evil army at Salamandastron with not only the bravery and physical strength of a burgeoning Badger Lord, but more importantly with the kind of smarts that can lead a terrifyingly outnumbered group of willing soldiers to topple an infectious empire before its hold on the land grows too strong and it becomes nearly impossible to break that hold. Brocktree must rise to the occasion as no other Badger Lord before or since, and demonstrate a level of heroism that will rock the foundations of Mossflower lore forever.

I thought the Redwall series had been starting to slow down prior to reading Lord Brocktree and its direct predecessor, but if Brian Jacques can keep up this standard of richly imaginative storytelling, then I have no doubt the final ten or so volumes to the series will be compelling reading I would not want to miss. Lord Brocktree stirred my spirit in a way I hadn't really felt for the last several books in the series, and left me eagerly wanting more of the story.

I would recommend this book to anyone who has read other Redwall books, or even as a possible introduction to the series. I don't think many readers will be disappointed with what they find in its pages. I would give three and a half stars to Lord Brocktree. Mar 06, Cameron rated it it was ok Recommends it for: Long suffering readers looking for a fun tale of adventure and conquest. Shelves: reviewed. Lord Brocktree is a tough book to rate. One one hand, the book contains a fun and interesting story with likable characters. On the other hand, there are so many things in this book that are either completely unnecessary or just plain annoying or both.

It comes down to this: Are the abundant annoyances present in this book forgivable due to the presence of a well told story? The answer to the above question, in this case, is no.

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Yes, Brocktree and Stonepaw are interesting characters who have a Lord Brocktree is a tough book to rate. Yes, Brocktree and Stonepaw are interesting characters who have a fun supporting cast up against an intimidating villain. Yes, the story surrounding these characters and there connection to Salamandastron is that an awesome name, or what?

But with everything that works well in Lord Brocktree, there's a fault that offsets it. Chief among those faults is the large amount of unnecessary content, especially in the first half of the book. Large portions of many chapters are dedicated to the description of tables full of food, dancing, and the singing of songs. I found myself thinking many times that I would rather be reading about Ungatt Trunn than hungry rabbits excuse me, hares and moles.

Speaking of moles Dialect is another issue in the novel. While I don't expect every species to talk exactly like the others, some characters any mole, for example speak in nigh unreadable dialects. I would audibly sigh whenever I was confronted with paragraph after paragraph of "mole speak". What was most frustrating about it though, was that I couldn't figure out if I was missing crucial plot points or just struggling to read an over elaborate description of rice. Perhaps, though, the fault is mine and I merely lack the faculties necessary to read the different dialects.

TTG Reads: "Lord Brocktree" Chapter 32

If you can deal with the above complaints, you'll likely really enjoy Lord Brocktree. It's an epic story with a large cast of fun characters. However, Lord Brocktree will likely cause more frustration than pleasure for less than patient readers. Jan 02, James Zanghi rated it did not like it Recommends it for: no one pretty much. Recommended to James by: My Parents gave it to me for my birthday back in One of the problems with the Redwall series is that the books have gotten extremely based on a formula and while that formula is pretty easy to like, it's still pretty easy to predict character actions in the later Redwall Novels like Lord Brocktree.


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Basically, the formula is villain makes appearance, causes trouble, new and most times inexperienced hero appears, lot of eating and description about food, some kumbahya-sing-round-the-campfire songs that are rips from Lord of the Rings and that d One of the problems with the Redwall series is that the books have gotten extremely based on a formula and while that formula is pretty easy to like, it's still pretty easy to predict character actions in the later Redwall Novels like Lord Brocktree.

Basically, the formula is villain makes appearance, causes trouble, new and most times inexperienced hero appears, lot of eating and description about food, some kumbahya-sing-round-the-campfire songs that are rips from Lord of the Rings and that don't really keep the plot going and just act as some filler space; climatic and predictable battle where villain army get their tails kicked from here to Salamondastron; a lot more eating; and finally narrative ending that tells the reader they shall be welcome in Redwall Abbey.

Plus, the fact that all of Brian Jacques' novels don't coherently fit together and build off of each other like Harry Potter or Wheel of Time is a factor. Lord Brocktree is no exception to his rule. You know how the story turns out after five minutes of reading and nothing really comes as a surprise.

The other thing that drives me nutty lately about the Redwall series is that animals like Rats, Weasels, and Stoats automatically have cruelty and brutality hardwired into their brains. That's almost racist. In short, this series of novels are full of conformity and cliche. So, in short, you're not missing much if you decide to not read the Redwall Series. View all 4 comments. Nov 22, Martina Sanjaya rated it it was amazing.

I just love every single book of the Redwall stories. I love the simpleness of plot, yet charmingly told. I love the characters, I love the things they do best. I love how the author painstakingly written down every weird accent, and I love how he created all the lovely food. I love all the wise advice along with the story; classic, told in old ways, but never boring with stories like this.

A great children book!

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Jun 09, Lisa rated it it was amazing. Beautiful Book, I absolutely adore Brian Jacques' writing, i have read many of his book multiples times starting at a young and continue to read them into my adult years. They never get boring dull or cumbersome. They may come across as whimsical to some, however this is what i love most about them. We all need more Whimsy in our lives.

Very excellent. This story, like the previous two books I've read in this series, boasted a nice [somewhat] fresh plot from the usual fare you get from Redwall. It was quite well done and enjoyable. Dec 17, Alexia rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone. Loved it. Brian Jacques is a force to be reckoned with. I've read the entire series. Nov 09, Megan Cutler rated it did not like it. It is a Redwall book. It followed the formula. There was an upstart baby animal, impossible to understand creatures and feasts.

Even though the theme of this book seemed to be that everyone should be able to function without food for long periods of time while alternately wasting it with foolish eating contests. My mistake was hoping this book would provide insight into the history and establishment of Salamandastron; it doesn't.

In fact, it doesn't do anything to distinguish it from the other It is a Redwall book. In fact, it doesn't do anything to distinguish it from the other books in the series, not even containing the iconic Lord Brocktree. While these books usually have one character that carries me through, all the characters in this book are kind of jerks, even the good guys.

In fact, if it weren't for the the fact that certain types of animals are always good and certain others evil, you'd have a hard time distinguishing the good and bad guys in this book. And for the first time, the typical teenage lead is allowed to go into battle, but suddenly babied the moment she steps close to blood. It might be interesting to fans of the series, but I only found it disappointing.

Not the best Redwall book, but still good. As many have said, Redwall has a plot pretty much set. Villain comes and does evil Usualy a wildcat, rat, stoat, ferret, weasel, fox or bird of some sort and a hero saves the day, usualy with killing only the main villian. Whike entertaining, this gets to be kinda unrealistic. Usualy, there is another to continue said villainy, not just a bunch of cowards. Regardless, a good series and book in general.

I like that we get to see more of the Redwall wor Not the best Redwall book, but still good. I like that we get to see more of the Redwall world, like in Mossflower and Martin the Warior to name a few "roaming" books. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Spoiler alert! Beautifully told. When Fleetscut and Jukka died together I literally cried, two enemies united in the end.

Feb 24, Sarah rated it it was amazing. Best purchase ever! Jul 31, Kelley rated it really liked it. This book is a beast to read aloud. My year-old son has been reading the Redwall books for several years. I could only make out about two-thirds of what I was saying he said. Everyone else I could u This book is a beast to read aloud. But the characters also are deeply emotional, with sharp senses of humor, hurt feelings and bursts of bravery that let them transcend self for the good of the company.

And the words are every bit as good as the story. Hear me. I refuse to sacrifice the lives of good and gallant creatures! I cried real tears at the death of one noble squirrel. And something inside me swelled when an evil leader came to an end that was absolute perfection. I may never be foolish enough to read another Jacques aloud. Oct 05, NATE rated it really liked it. Honestly a really good read, very descriptive and engaging.

I was surprised how violent it got for a children's story. It was turned out to be a really good fantasy adventure story, with really interesting and well developed characters. Aug 08, Sarah TheAromaofBooks added it. My second DNF in as many days. I'm really struggling to get into a book right now. Jul 20, Stephen rated it really liked it.

I read this one to my kids. How can you not love an epic fantasy story about a Badger Lord taking back his mountain kingdom from a deranged wildcat? And there are so many otters! It's too bad Jacques has passed away. Nov 10, Adam Golden rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. While the stories told are usually fairly formulaic throughout the series, there is a certain charm that each book has that still makes it an enjoyable and comfy read.

The monstrous badger Lord Brocktree himself is possibly one of the most badass heroes Jacque's has ever created, and helps pave the way for the lore of the series considering that this book, chronologically, is the first. While the ending is great, the build up to it was very slow and almost difficult to get through at times - mostly because of certain dialects that are exaggerated and grating to read. Apr 03, Richard rated it liked it. My exposure to the Redwall series has been that of attempting to read Salamanastron when I was a kid and not getting passed the first few chapters due to the dialect.

A few years ago i attempted to try to break into the series again as I read through Redwall and thoroughly enjoyed it. So, here I was, trying to decide where to go in regards to continuing the series. I decided to read Lord Brocktree and while I can honestly say that I enjoyed the book, it is no Redwall. While Redwall had a pretty d My exposure to the Redwall series has been that of attempting to read Salamanastron when I was a kid and not getting passed the first few chapters due to the dialect. While Redwall had a pretty direct approach to the plot and getting to that point, Lord Brocktree seems less focused and has a tendency to meander.

The last third of the book really comes together and becomes a fun read when everything comes to a head but the first bit of the book was a little difficult to slog through due to character development and interaction. I found that while Lord Brocktree has great characters and the interactions between them can be fun, there were too many characters to keep track of and there seems to be a lot of conversation and silly-ness without moving the story along.

It's sort of a "too much of a good thing" situation where, sure it's fun and all but, I found myself sitting there saying, "Yea I get it, the animals love all different types of food and they love singing, but what about the takeover of Salamandastron? Could be a spoiler? I was a bit surprised to read this in the book as besides a few mentions of animals fighting and killing each other during certain battles, the rest of the book is animals singing and eating and all in all being pretty innocent.

Lord Brocktree, it's a decent little book but to me it just felt like it needed to be more focused on the task at hand and a little less focused on meals and songs. Jan 04, Elizabeth rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy , children-s. Lord Brocktree is probably the cleverest Badger Lord of the Redwall series and throughout the book relies more on his brain than his brawn. Another nice departure was the antagonism between Fleetscut and Jukka and the maidenry of Dotti.

Like I said above, Brocktree is smart, and we get to see him both come up with and carry out his plans. For some reason, I thought the ending of the book was really well done. The army breaking up and going their separate ways on their ships was just really touching. Also, Rulango is the best heron ever. This one had some unique features acquiring the army from Bucko, the defense, siege, counter-attack, etc.

Lord Brocktree is the 13th book published in the Redwall universe but the first to take place chronologically. I've been a massive fan of Brian Jacques ever since I was a child or a dibbun as they would say in the Redwall world and re-reading the series changes very few things for me. The plot is simple: Peace has gone on for too long near the mountain fortress of Salamandastron; the ancestral home of the badger lords. Ungatt Trunn the wild cat arrives with his massive horde and lays siege to th Lord Brocktree is the 13th book published in the Redwall universe but the first to take place chronologically.

Ungatt Trunn the wild cat arrives with his massive horde and lays siege to the mountain. Meanwhile, an army is amassed to come to the aid of the mountain. The thing about Redwall novels that makes them great it the camaraderie. All of these novels have darkness in them. There is hardship and suffering, and cruelty. Some of the characters backstories can be brutal, especially for the age group these stories are marketed towards, but the characters never give up. A major criticism I see from other readers of these books is how formulaic they are, and while that is true it also allows us to really enjoy the lore of the world.

We know there is going to be a villain, a land quest or sea quest, some magic, and food, and singing. What that really brings out is the new elements Jacques brings to each story. Redwall is an ever-deepening world. Each novel ends with an invitation to come back to the world of Redwall and that is why I think so many of us choose to keep coming back. Jan 30, Alex H rated it it was amazing. In this book there are many characters. Lord Stonepaw is the new Badger Lord who is on an adventure to take his throne at Salamandstron, which is the home of the Badger Lords.

Dotti is a hare who is on an adventure with Lord Brocktree to visit her aunt at Salamandstron. Lord Stonepaw is Lord Brocktree's father. He is the current Badger Lord and is waiting for his son to arrive In this book there are many characters. He is the current Badger Lord and is waiting for his son to arrive and the mountain to take his throne. Ungratt Trun is a wildcat who has decided to take his army of blue vermin to conquer Salamandstron.

King Bucko Bigbones is a self appointed king of the northern mountain hares. All the hares in the story go with Lord Brocktee and help defeat Ungatt Trun. Brian Jacques June 2, Ages The young haremaid Dotti and the badger-warrior Lord Brocktree—unlikely comrades—set out for Salamandastron together, only to discover the legendary mountain has been captured by the wildcat Ungatt Trunn and his Blue Hordes. To face them, the two must rally an army—hares and otters, shrews and moles, mice and squirrels—and execute a plan that makes up in cleverness what it lacks in force!

More by Brian Jacques See more. Redwall: A Tale from Redwall. Book 1. The question in this first volume is resoundingly clear: What can the peace-loving mice of Redwall Abbey do to defend themselves against Cluny the Scourge and his battle-seasoned army of rats? If only they had the sword of Martin the Warrior, they might have a chance. But the legendary weapon has long been forgotten-except, that is, by the bumbling young apprentice Matthias, who becomes the unlikeliest of heroes.

Teeming with riddles, humor, unforgettable characters, and high-bounding adventure, the original Redwall, the launching point for a series that has captured the world's attention, features seven full-color illustrations by renowned illustrator Troy Howell.

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This new paperback edition is a must-have for both longtime fans and first-time readers. Book Tamello De Fformelo Tussock wants more than anything to join the Long Patrol, those staunch and stalwart hare warriors who make their home at the top of Salamandastron Mountain. But Tammo, as he is called, is too young and inexperienced. Or is he? Guided by the nomad squirrel Russa, Tammo makes his way to Redwall, where the Long Patrol has gathered to protect their beloved Abbey from the great rat Rapscallions.

And as the mighty rats rear their ugly heads and ancient Redwall warriors fall, young Tammo learns what life, death and honor really mean as a new generation of Redwall heroes comes to the fore to save their home from evil. Reviews Review Policy. Published on. Flowing text. Best For. Web, Tablet, Phone, eReader. Content Protection. Learn More. Flag as inappropriate.

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It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders. Continue the series. See more. Taggerung: A Tale from Redwall. Years ago, the vermin clan of Sawney Rath kidnapped one of Redwall's own-a baby otter, destined to become their "Taggerung," a warrior hero of ancient legend.


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  • But as young Tagg grows, he rebels against his destiny. The young otter journeys in search of his birthplace, a member of Sawney's clan always near, out to destroy the deserter. With the feisty mouse Nimbalo, Tagg fends off the avenging vermin, but can he find his way back to the Redwall family from whom he was separated so long ago? Here is all of the excitement and adventure a Redwall fan could wish for! Brave squirrelmaid Triss plans a daring escape from the enslavement of the evil ferret King Agarnu and his daughter Princess Kurda….

    In this sixteenth Redwall adventure, Martha Braebuck, a young hare-maid, wheelchair bound since infancy, wonders about a mysterious old poem relating to the ancient abbey of Loamhedge--and whether it may hold the key to her cure. Rakkety Tam. Rakkety Tam MacBurl is a brave border warrior who has travelled south in search of adventure. But when his army is attacked by an evil flesh-eating band, adventure finds him. Gulo the Savage, wolverine, flesh-eater and brutal killer, has come to Mossflower in search of his brother who stole the mystical stone that will make one of them king of the lands of ice and snow.

    This fast-paced adventure will keep readers on their toes until the final battle. High Rhulain. Tiria Wildlough, a young ottermaid touched by the paw of destiny, embarks on a journey to the mysterious Green Isle, where she joins a band of outlaw otters to rid the land of the villainous Wildcat chieftain Riggu Fellis and his catguard slave masters….

    More featuring mammals. Poppy and Rye. Book 3. The third book in the beloved Poppy series by Newbery Medal—winning author Avi, with illustrations from Caldecott Medal—winning artist Brian Floca, is available as an ebook for the first time! Ereth's Birthday. Book 4. The fourth book in the beloved Poppy series by Newbery Medal—winning author Avi, with illustrations from Caldecott Medal—winning artist Brian Floca, is available as an ebook for the first time! Kenneth Oppel. The forest heaves and splits in a terrible quake, and Griffin, a newborn Silverwing, is sucked deep into the earth.

    When Griffin is sucked into the Underworld, his father Shade must act fast—for legend says that if the living stumble into the land of the dead, they only have a short time before death claims them as its own. But something else is hunting Griffin, too. Something dark. Something sinister. Something buried deep in a past that Shade hoped he'd never have to revisit.

    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)
    Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13) Lord Brocktree (Redwall, Book 13)

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